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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
are you prepared to have the congress go over the fiscal cliff, in other words? that's the question people asked when the president threatened to default two years ago and people said would the republicans cause the default? no, only the president can cause the default because only the president decides whether or not to pay interest the president i think has decided to go over the fiscal cliff for a number of reasons because he thinks he can blame other people for it. i hope he doesn't do that. two years ago he extended the business office for all this drama. he may decide to push us over a cliff. >> woodruff: finally, grover norquist, will there be a political price to pay for republicans who vote to raise taxes if that is what it comes down to? >> republicans will take a look, most republicans have committed, not to me, but their constituents, that they won't raise taxes and fight against tax increases. whatever they vote for they have to go to their constituents and say this wasn't a tax increase or let me explain to you what i did. they have to talk to their constituents. most republi
house slow-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff. now, if the president doesn't agree with our approach, he's got an obligation to put forward a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. because right now the american people have to be scratching their heads and wondering when is the president going to get serious? >> on that question of whether or not we have put forward specific spending cuts, the answer is is we have. not only that, we signed law a trillion dollars in specific spending cuts. so if you combine what is signed into law with what we proposed versus the total absence of any specificity from the republicans for a single dollar in revenue, i think in the battle of specificity, the outcome has already been decided. >> woodruff: and a short time ago an administration official told us the president and the speaker spoke by phone this evening. now to our series of conversations on this subject and what should be done. we've listened to a range of opinions in recent days, including erskine bowles of the simpson-bowles commission; prize-win
in the coming days. online we have a report from our partners at kaiser health news on how the fiscal cliff could affect health care for the military and for medicare patients. >> brown: next, a potential crisis of a different kind, one that has new urgency after hurricane sandy and that also involves federal spending: rising sea levels. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg announced a new long-term initiative to protect the city from future natural disasters. he called for rebuilding vulnerable coastal areas, but dismissed again the idea of constructing a large sea-gate across the harbor. >> we're not going to abandon the waterfront. we're not going to abandon the rockaways or coney island or staten island's south shore. but we can't just rebuild what was there and hope for the best. we have to build smarter and stronger and more sustainably. >> woodruff: 350 miles south. the city of norfolk, virginia, is another coastal city vulnerable to sea level rise and extreme storms. but its mayor has said parts of his city might not be livable in the future. our producer, mike melia, travel
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)